You guys, I’m having a real problem deciding who to romance first in Inquisition. 

knight-enchanter:

stares at cassandra’s hair

the more i look it the more I DON’T UNDERSTAND

Maybe it’s some kind of padwan/rattail braid? Which, oh honey no. It’s not 1987, Miss Pentaghast.

lithefider:

bead-bead:

Amen.

Wow this is actually pretty accurate.

I’m so grateful there wasn’t any online social media-type things when I was growing up. I was on Usenet though, which is now entirely searchable by Google going back to 1981 or whenever it started up. I thank the Gods that younger me had the prescience to not use her real name.

lithefider:

bead-bead:

Amen.

Wow this is actually pretty accurate.

I’m so grateful there wasn’t any online social media-type things when I was growing up. I was on Usenet though, which is now entirely searchable by Google going back to 1981 or whenever it started up. I thank the Gods that younger me had the prescience to not use her real name.

(Source: iraffiruse, via kattahj)

knight-enchanter:

“Crafting and Customization Q&A
An introduction to crafting and customization from creative director Mike Laidlaw:
Before we dive into your questions, let’s talk about Inquisition's crafting at a high level. Our goal in allowing you to create your own armor and weapons was twofold. First, we wanted you to have a lot of opportunities to customize your look. Second, we wanted to encourage experimentation and, if things were really cooking, targeted creation.
One example we always used when describing the goals of crafting was that of the dragon hunter. We wanted you, as a player, to have the tools necessary to build armor and weapons custom-tooled toward hunting one of our massive namesakes.
To that end, we developed the concept of the schematic. A schematic determines the shape of the blade if you’re crafting a sword or the shape of the core armor if you’re crafting protective gear. Each schematic takes some combination of metals, leathers, and cloths, and the materials you choose to use determine the effectiveness of the gear, any bonuses built into it, and the visual appearance. A serpentstone blade, for instance, will be a dull greenish color, and onyx will be a shiny black.
Once you have a core piece of gear, you may also be able to upgrade it. If an armor can take upgrades, they will change the shape of the armor as well as add new properties, but will inherit the color scheme of the core body of the armor. Similarly, if you install a new hilt or pommel onto your sword, it will smoothly unify to match the rest of the blade’s color scheme.
Oh, and you can name any gear you create, of course. Perhaps you’re a Chumbawamba fan and want to call your war hammer “Nugthumper.” Who are we to deny you such simple pleasures?
Now let’s get to your questions!
If I choose not to craft, will I still be able to find unique or powerful weapons and armor? —Evgeny Negurista, VK.com, Russia
[CHRIS PICKFORD, PRODUCER]: Absolutely, the game doesn’t rely on crafting as a necessary component. There are plenty of shiny things to find in Thedas!
[MIKE LAIDLAW]: One of our goals is to let you play the game you want to, so if you want to loot only, loot on!
How will the inventory of your backpack be managed in DAI? Will it be determined by number of slots or weight of objects? —Bejita Saiyajin, Facebook, France
[CP]: Inventory is determined by number of slots. We found this worked better because for most people, it’s easier to keep mental track of a straightforward number. Additionally, as you power up your Inquisition, you can improve your inventory slots via Inquisition customization.
Will there be schematics to craft weapons and armor? —Anton Pavlov, VK.com, Russia
[CP]: Yes, schematics are found or bought, and they give you access to a very wide range of options for your weapons and armor.
[ML]: There’s quite a wide collection of them, too, and since your Inquisition’s crafters are, well, crafty, you can find some pretty exotic mixes. An Enchanter Mail schematic, for instance, might use more metal than normal mage armor schematics, but the result will also look sturdier.
Are craftable weapons comparably strong to looted ones? —Jannis Fritsche, Facebook, Germany
[CP]: They can be, yes. It depends how you manage your crafting materials. For instance, dragon bone is one of the hardest crafting materials you can get. Do you put it into an armor slot to harden your defense? Or do you put it into an attacking slot for high damage per second? Or maybe a utility slot for a strength upgrade? Or what about a masterwork slot for a chance to cast a special attack? Powerful items like these take time, effort, and planning to create.
Can we craft weapons with elemental effects? —@yohanksm, Twitter
[CP]: Absolutely. Both the masterworking system and the runes system can apply elemental effects, some of which can help trigger cross-class combos with other abilities. An example is a masterwork material that gives a chance to cast Chain Lightning on a hit, shocking enemies and setting them up for a detonation attack such as Explosive Shot. Runes are exceptionally useful for targeting specific faction groups such as dragons, demons, and undead.
[ML]: In addition to the rarer systems Chris points out, base enchanting applies visual effects to your weapons as well. The writers have gotten a little competitive in the past few weeks, trying to out-craft one another. A greataxe crackling with electricity is a heck of a thing on the battlefield.
Can mage staves also be modified? —Mari Villoz, Facebook, Spain
[CP]: Yes, staves can also be modified, and they even get some special runes that apply only to them.
[ML]: You can also change the shape of the bottom’s blade and the grip, and as with every other modification, you can also build custom mods that apply exactly the properties you want and install them, should off-the-shelf purchased modifications not suit.
Can you craft absolutely unique armor or weapons? —Mikhail Panasyuk, VK.com, Russia
[CP]: Yes, and we even let you name your equipment at the end! Between item creation, modification, runes, and masterworking—you’ve got a lot to play with.
Will there be new materials to the series to craft items with? —Askold Sivoronsky, VK.com, Russia
[CP]: Yes, we’ve had to expand the number of crafting materials to cover all the gameplay improvements we wanted to make. There are even some materials that allow characters to wear armor that isn’t necessarily allowed for their class… but it’s very rare.
Will there be rare crafting materials, or are most of them easy to find? —@FreshRevenge, Twitter
[CP]: As with any major system, it will vary. Common crafting nodes will be plentiful and easy to spot, whereas the rare or legendary crafting nodes will take some exploring to uncover. That said, when you start getting into masterworking, you might find a top-tier common material with an unusual property. For example, iron is a very common material; however, if you find top-tier masterworking iron, it can give you a chance to become Unbowed on a hit. You’ll have to find out what that means later. ;-)
[ML]: To continue being a tease: you’ll find that the Inquisition’s crafting capabilities grow over time, too. The system starts out quite flexible, but adds even more complexity after certain events.
COMBO QUESTION!
What level of customization will we have with our companions? —Emil Hellberg, Facebook, Sweden
Does the customization of our companions’ outfits show visual changes for them? —Dragon Age Fan Page, Facebook, France
Is there an opportunity to change colors of armor and robes? Also, are there cloaks and hoods in the game? —@Worlddragonage, Twitter
[CP]: All companions have the same customization system as the Inquisitor, so all characters can be modified to your will.
[ML]: The characters do have their own themes, though, so an Enchanter Mail (as referenced above) will look different on Dorian, Solas, Vivienne, and the Inquisitor. Many properties do carry over, though, especially colors, so predominantly red outfits will still be red across characters—they’ll just be styled to better reflect their personalities. We figure that, with its army of smiths, the Inquisition can handle a few tweaks here and there. Of course, if you find more emblematic armor, like, say, Grey Warden mail, you can expect that to look like its namesake on whoever wears it.
Will the Inquisitor have civilian or casual clothing to wear while at Skyhold? —Pierrick Boyet Trinity, Facebook, France
[ML]: While you’re in Skyhold, your Inquisitor will be in more casual wear, yes.
Will we be able to craft items for “decorating” our keep? —Francis Blaxell, Facebook, Sweden
[CP]: We do allow customization of the keep using themes such as Ferelden or Orlais; however, they are earned in a different system unique to your Inquisition. That said, we do have the requisitions system that interacts directly with crafting and helps you to power up your Inquisition, leading to more cool stuff for Skyhold.
Regarding mounts, will we be able to modify the accessories, color, etc.? —Eaven D. R. Redondo, Facebook, Spain
[CP]: As you progress through Dragon Age: Inquisition, you’ll get access to sturdier mounts of different styles and patterns. While you won’t be able tweak each component for mounts, we do allow you to choose from different styles and colors for your steed.
Dragon Age: Inquisition releases on November 18 for PC, Xbox One, Xbox 360, PlayStation 4, and PlayStation 3.”

Oh damn. That male qunari Inquisitor is fiiiiiiiine. 

knight-enchanter:

Crafting and Customization Q&A

An introduction to crafting and customization from creative director Mike Laidlaw:

Before we dive into your questions, let’s talk about Inquisition's crafting at a high level. Our goal in allowing you to create your own armor and weapons was twofold. First, we wanted you to have a lot of opportunities to customize your look. Second, we wanted to encourage experimentation and, if things were really cooking, targeted creation.

One example we always used when describing the goals of crafting was that of the dragon hunter. We wanted you, as a player, to have the tools necessary to build armor and weapons custom-tooled toward hunting one of our massive namesakes.

To that end, we developed the concept of the schematic. A schematic determines the shape of the blade if you’re crafting a sword or the shape of the core armor if you’re crafting protective gear. Each schematic takes some combination of metals, leathers, and cloths, and the materials you choose to use determine the effectiveness of the gear, any bonuses built into it, and the visual appearance. A serpentstone blade, for instance, will be a dull greenish color, and onyx will be a shiny black.

Once you have a core piece of gear, you may also be able to upgrade it. If an armor can take upgrades, they will change the shape of the armor as well as add new properties, but will inherit the color scheme of the core body of the armor. Similarly, if you install a new hilt or pommel onto your sword, it will smoothly unify to match the rest of the blade’s color scheme.

Oh, and you can name any gear you create, of course. Perhaps you’re a Chumbawamba fan and want to call your war hammer “Nugthumper.” Who are we to deny you such simple pleasures?

Now let’s get to your questions!

If I choose not to craft, will I still be able to find unique or powerful weapons and armor? —Evgeny Negurista, VK.com, Russia

[CHRIS PICKFORD, PRODUCER]: Absolutely, the game doesn’t rely on crafting as a necessary component. There are plenty of shiny things to find in Thedas!

[MIKE LAIDLAW]: One of our goals is to let you play the game you want to, so if you want to loot only, loot on!

How will the inventory of your backpack be managed in DAI? Will it be determined by number of slots or weight of objects? —Bejita Saiyajin, Facebook, France

[CP]: Inventory is determined by number of slots. We found this worked better because for most people, it’s easier to keep mental track of a straightforward number. Additionally, as you power up your Inquisition, you can improve your inventory slots via Inquisition customization.

Will there be schematics to craft weapons and armor? —Anton Pavlov, VK.com, Russia

[CP]: Yes, schematics are found or bought, and they give you access to a very wide range of options for your weapons and armor.

[ML]: There’s quite a wide collection of them, too, and since your Inquisition’s crafters are, well, crafty, you can find some pretty exotic mixes. An Enchanter Mail schematic, for instance, might use more metal than normal mage armor schematics, but the result will also look sturdier.

Are craftable weapons comparably strong to looted ones? —Jannis Fritsche, Facebook, Germany

[CP]: They can be, yes. It depends how you manage your crafting materials. For instance, dragon bone is one of the hardest crafting materials you can get. Do you put it into an armor slot to harden your defense? Or do you put it into an attacking slot for high damage per second? Or maybe a utility slot for a strength upgrade? Or what about a masterwork slot for a chance to cast a special attack? Powerful items like these take time, effort, and planning to create.

Can we craft weapons with elemental effects? —@yohanksm, Twitter

[CP]: Absolutely. Both the masterworking system and the runes system can apply elemental effects, some of which can help trigger cross-class combos with other abilities. An example is a masterwork material that gives a chance to cast Chain Lightning on a hit, shocking enemies and setting them up for a detonation attack such as Explosive Shot. Runes are exceptionally useful for targeting specific faction groups such as dragons, demons, and undead.

[ML]: In addition to the rarer systems Chris points out, base enchanting applies visual effects to your weapons as well. The writers have gotten a little competitive in the past few weeks, trying to out-craft one another. A greataxe crackling with electricity is a heck of a thing on the battlefield.

Can mage staves also be modified? —Mari Villoz, Facebook, Spain

[CP]: Yes, staves can also be modified, and they even get some special runes that apply only to them.

[ML]: You can also change the shape of the bottom’s blade and the grip, and as with every other modification, you can also build custom mods that apply exactly the properties you want and install them, should off-the-shelf purchased modifications not suit.

Can you craft absolutely unique armor or weapons? —Mikhail Panasyuk, VK.com, Russia

[CP]: Yes, and we even let you name your equipment at the end! Between item creation, modification, runes, and masterworking—you’ve got a lot to play with.

Will there be new materials to the series to craft items with? —Askold Sivoronsky, VK.com, Russia

[CP]: Yes, we’ve had to expand the number of crafting materials to cover all the gameplay improvements we wanted to make. There are even some materials that allow characters to wear armor that isn’t necessarily allowed for their class… but it’s very rare.

Will there be rare crafting materials, or are most of them easy to find? —@FreshRevenge, Twitter

[CP]: As with any major system, it will vary. Common crafting nodes will be plentiful and easy to spot, whereas the rare or legendary crafting nodes will take some exploring to uncover. That said, when you start getting into masterworking, you might find a top-tier common material with an unusual property. For example, iron is a very common material; however, if you find top-tier masterworking iron, it can give you a chance to become Unbowed on a hit. You’ll have to find out what that means later. ;-)

[ML]: To continue being a tease: you’ll find that the Inquisition’s crafting capabilities grow over time, too. The system starts out quite flexible, but adds even more complexity after certain events.

COMBO QUESTION!

What level of customization will we have with our companions? —Emil Hellberg, Facebook, Sweden

Does the customization of our companions’ outfits show visual changes for them? —Dragon Age Fan Page, Facebook, France

Is there an opportunity to change colors of armor and robes? Also, are there cloaks and hoods in the game? —@Worlddragonage, Twitter

[CP]: All companions have the same customization system as the Inquisitor, so all characters can be modified to your will.

[ML]: The characters do have their own themes, though, so an Enchanter Mail (as referenced above) will look different on Dorian, Solas, Vivienne, and the Inquisitor. Many properties do carry over, though, especially colors, so predominantly red outfits will still be red across characters—they’ll just be styled to better reflect their personalities. We figure that, with its army of smiths, the Inquisition can handle a few tweaks here and there. Of course, if you find more emblematic armor, like, say, Grey Warden mail, you can expect that to look like its namesake on whoever wears it.

Will the Inquisitor have civilian or casual clothing to wear while at Skyhold? —Pierrick Boyet Trinity, Facebook, France

[ML]: While you’re in Skyhold, your Inquisitor will be in more casual wear, yes.

Will we be able to craft items for “decorating” our keep? —Francis Blaxell, Facebook, Sweden

[CP]: We do allow customization of the keep using themes such as Ferelden or Orlais; however, they are earned in a different system unique to your Inquisition. That said, we do have the requisitions system that interacts directly with crafting and helps you to power up your Inquisition, leading to more cool stuff for Skyhold.

Regarding mounts, will we be able to modify the accessories, color, etc.? —Eaven D. R. Redondo, Facebook, Spain

[CP]: As you progress through Dragon Age: Inquisition, you’ll get access to sturdier mounts of different styles and patterns. While you won’t be able tweak each component for mounts, we do allow you to choose from different styles and colors for your steed.

Dragon Age: Inquisition releases on November 18 for PC, Xbox One, Xbox 360, PlayStation 4, and PlayStation 3.”

Oh damn. That male qunari Inquisitor is fiiiiiiiine. 

It claims each man as it will.

(Source: battletempo, via shadoedseptmbr)

emberkeelty:

aporeticelenchus:

heidi8:

sonneillonv:

dressthesavage:

narwhalsareunderwaterunicorns:

anglofile:

spicyshimmy:

how is it possible to love fictional characters this much and also have people always been this way?

like, did queen elizabeth lie in bed late sometimes thinking ‘VERILY I CANNOT EVEN FOR MERCUTIO HATH SLAIN ME WITH FEELS’ 

was caesar like ‘ET TU ODYSSEUS’ 

sometimes i wonder

image

oh my GOD

the answer is yes they did. there’s a lot of research about the highly emotional reactions to the first novels widely available in print. 

here’s a thing; the printing press was invented in 1450 and whilst it was revolutionary it wasn’t very good. but then it got better over time and by the 16th century there were publications, novels, scientific journals, folios, pamphlets and newspapers all over Europe. at first most were educational or theological, or reprints of classical works.

however, novels gained in popularity, as basically what most people wanted was to read for pleasure. they became salacious, extremely dramatic, with tragic heroines and doomed love and flawed heroes (see classical literature, only more extreme.) books in the form of letters were common. sensationalism was par the course and apparently used to teach moral lessons. there was also a lot of erotica floating around. 

but here’s the thing: due to the greater availability of literature and the rise of comfy furniture (i shit you not this is an actual historical fact, the 16th and 17th century was when beds and chairs got comfy) people started reading novels for pleasure, women especially. as these novels were highly emotional, they too became…highly emotional. there are loads of contemporary reports of young women especially fainting, having hysterics, or crying fits lasting for days due to the death of a character or their otp’s doomed love. they became insensible over books and characters, and were very vocal about it. men weren’t immune-there’s a long letter a middle-aged man wrote to the author of his favourite work basically saying that the novel is too sad, he can’t handle all his feels, if they don’t get together he won’t be able to go on, and his heart is already broken at the heroine’s tragic state (IIRC ehh). 

conservatives at the time were seriously worried about the effects of literature on people’s mental health, and thought it damaging to both morals and society. so basically yes it is exactly like what happens on tumblr when we cry over attractive British men, only my historical theory (get me) is that their emotions were even more intense, as they hadn’t had a life of sensationalist media to numb the pain for them beforehand in the same way we do, nor did they have the giant group therapy session that is tumblr. 

(don’t even get me started on the classical/early medieval dudes and their boners for the Iliad i will be here all week. suffice to say, the members of the Byzantine court used Homeric puns instead of talking normally to each other if someone who hand’t studied the classics was in the room. they had dickish fandom in-jokes. boom.) 

I needed to know this.

See, we’re all just the current steps in a time-honored tradition! (And this post is good to read along with Affectingly’s post this week about old-school-fandom-and-history-and-stuff.

Ancient Iliad fandom is intense

Alexander the Great and and his boyfriend totally RPed Achilles and Patroclus. Alexander shipped that hard. (It’s possible that this story is apocryphal, but that would just mean that ancient historians were writing RPS about Alexander and Hephaestion RPing Iliad slash and honestly that’s just as good).

And then there’s this gem from Plato:

"Very different was the reward of the true love of Achilles towards his lover Patroclus - his lover and not his love (the notion that Patroclus was the beloved one is a foolish error into which Aeschylus has fallen, for Achilles was surely the fairer of the two, fairer also than all the other heroes; and, as Homer informs us, he was still beardless, and younger far)” - Symposium

That’s right: 4th Century BCE arguments about who topped. Nihil novi sub sole my friends.

More on this glorious subject from people who know way more than I do

There’s also the phenomenon of “Werther Fever”! Goethe’s 18th century novel The Sorrows of Young Werther was insanely popular. The main character—Werther—is passionate and artistic and given to being overcome with emotion. Naturally, he falls in love with an unattainable woman and then tortures himself by hanging out with her and her husband all the time. As you do. He *spoiler alert* ends up committing suicide. 

Young men across Europe took to dressing and acting like Werther and making pilgrimages to the places in the novel. Supposedly, there was even a rash of copycat suicides. 

(via donnaimmaculata)

Tags: fandom

purepopfornowpeople:

Time is a flat circle.

purepopfornowpeople:

Time is a flat circle.

(via brocanteur)

Endure and survive?

Joel + fight scenes - enemies

Dragon Age Inquisition Romance List

dgaider:

For those who keep asking the details on the DAI romance, Mike Laidlaw kindly posted the complete list on the BioWare forums. Go, read if you wish to know the details ahead of time, and apologies to those who are disappointed.

Oh. My. God. Without spoiling, I am extremely happy with this. I am going to replay this game so many times, y’all!

Switching from iPhone to an Android phone this week. Happy about the switch except for one thing: I’ll have to get used to life w/o xkit mobile again! 

Any app recommendations (for tumblr or any other neat things)?

Summer

nonnegative:

imsirius:

Backstage Tour with Daniel Radcliffe on The Cripple of Inishmaan x

how am i just now learning that danrad loves the rock???

Who doesn’t love the Rock?

(Source: igperish)

archiemcphee:

The leaf pictured at the top of this post isn’t a leaf at all. It’s made of paper and is an exquisite example of the Japanese art of papercutting is called Kirie (切り絵, meaning ‘cut paper’). All of the extraordinarily delicate examples of the Kirie seen here were handmade by a self-taught Japanese artist named Akira Nagaya, whose skills were first discovered about 30 years ago while he was working in a sushi shop.

"One of his first tasks was to learn sasabaran, a technique to create decorations by cutting slices into bamboo leaves. Back at home, and recalling his boss’s demonstration, Nagaya tried to practice using paper and a utility knife. He found that the technique came quite naturally, and he enjoyed doing it.”

Years later Nagaya was still making his intricate paper objects when he opened his very own restaurant and decided to display his kirie “for fun.” When a local newspaper showed up to review his restaurant they spotted his creations and encouraged him to display them in a gallery.

“That was the first time I even considered what I had been doing as art,” recalls Nagaya.

Head over to Akira Nagaya’s Facebook page to check out many more of his marvelous cut paper creations.

[via Spoon & Tamago]